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Reason and Unreason in Science and its effects on Society

Peter Lachmann
Tuesday April 24, 2012

Event:
BioVisionAlexandria 2012 Conference
Biography:
Emeritus Professor of Immunology, University of Cambridge Sir Peter Julius Lachmann, MBBChir PhD ScD (Cantab) FRCP FRCPath FRS FMedSci Emeritus Sheila Joan Smith Professor of Immunology, University of Cambridge. Peter Lachmann trained in biochemistry and medicine at Cambridge and University College Hospital graduating MBBChir in 1956. He was a postgraduate student in immunology with Robin Coombs in Cambridge and with Henry Kunkel at Rockefeller University and obtained his PhD in 1962 for a thesis on the pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. He was Assistant Director of Research in the Department of Pathology in Cambridge (1964-1971) and Foundation Professor of Immunology at the Royal Postgraduate Medical School (1971-1975). Since 1976, he has worked in Cambridge as Director of the MRC Molecular Immunopathology Unit and Professor of Immunology. He retired in 1999 but ran a laboratory till 2005 and will reopen a small lab in 2011. He is a fellow of Christ’s College and an honorary fellow of Trinity College. His principal research interests have been in the immunochemistry, biology and genetics of the complement system. He is currently trying to bring to clinical application a method of down-regulating the complement feedback loop, over activity of which is the main predisposing factor to age related macular degeneration. He was the founder President of the UK Academy of Medical Sciences (1998-2002), Biological Secretary of the Royal Society (1993–98) and President of the Royal College of Pathologists (1990-93); and served on UNESCO’s international bioethics committee from 1993-98. In these capacities, he became involved with the ethical and policy aspects of medical science. He has kept bees for over thirty years and this hobby has played a large part in stimulating the interest in genetic and cultural evolution.